Tuesday discussion guide

Title: Tuesday

 

Author: David Wiesner

Illustrator: David Wiesner

Publisher: Andersen Press

 

SYNOPSIS

In this imaginative, virtually wordless picture book strange things happen on a Tuesday night. Frogs are sitting on their Lily pads but at 8.00 they find they have the power to lift off. They fly to a nearby town where they  have an exuberant adventure, which causes havoc.  Next morning, normality is restored and the police are left to ponder at the large lily pads scattered all over the town. What will happen next Tuesday?

Reminiscent of a Twilight Zone story, this award winning picture book uses film-like technique to take create a story that readers will love to interpret. The crepuscular tones evoke the twilight mode - a time when we feel , perhaps, that anything can happen. There is much to talk about and interpret and the book will inspire children to write their own stories and text in different genre e.g. news reports.

DISCUSSION POINTS

Cover:  what do you notice on the front cover? Is there anything strange or puzzling? Turn the page and look at the three frames with the frogs. What do you think is happening here?

First spread: what do you notice about the three frames at the beginning of the story?

The three frames zoom in on the turtle sitting on a log. This technique is used a lot in films. An establishing shot opens a film and is then followed by close-ups. What information can we get from an establishing shot (e.g. setting)? What information can we get from a close-up (e.g. emotions and reactions)?

Can you tell what the frogs are thinking and feeling from the way they are drawn and painted?

Can you suggest some words and phrases that could be used to describe the  way in which the frogs are flying on the different pages?

Final spread:  What do you think the people are saying and thinking? (Tip: you could use speech bobble post-it notes to add dialogue to this page. Alternatively you could recreate a freeze frame of this spread and bring parts of it to life so that children can improvise the dialogue)

Tuesday is virtually wordless. Why do you think David Wiesner decided to tell his story this way? Look at the few sentences in the book. Why do you think words 9and numbers) are used here? How would it affect the way we read the story if there were no words at all?

Tuesday is an American book and it won the prestigious Caldecott medal for illustration. Ask the children if they know the names of any children’s book prizes in the UK and make a collection of prize winning books for them to read independently.

Double page spread  of the following morning:  What do you think the people are saying and thinking? (Tip: you could use speech bobble post-it notes to add dialogue to this page. Alternatively you could recreate a freeze frame of this spread and bring parts of it to life so that children can improvise the dialogue)

Penultimate spread: what do you think is going to happen next?

Final spread: can you think of any reasons that David Wiesner chose pigs as the next animal to have an adventure? In pairs or in a story circle, tell the story of what happens to the pigs on their adventure.

Would this story be different if it was set in the daytime?

Why do you think David Wiesner called this book Tuesday?  Can you think of an alternative title for the book? (Tip: alternatively cover the title of the book so that children can’t read it and after reading ask them what they think the title might be. Reveal the title and discuss whether they are surprised. 

Imagine you are an ‘expert’ on the Tuesday evening phenomenon. A journalist has come to interview you. In pairs, improvise the interview. Share your ideas in a group. Which did you like best?

 

Copyright: Just Imagine Story Centre Ltd

All rights reserved.

These notes may be printed freely for use in classrooms but may not be reproduced in any other format without the permission of the author.

← Previous Post Next Post →